COVID-19: We are accepting TELEMEDICINE appointments. To book a TELEMEDICINE VISIT click here

Not all rain boots are created equal.

WHY CAN RAIN BOOTS BE HARD ON YOUR FEET?

 

Rain boots can be hard on your feet because the majority of them do not offer the proper shock absorption, arch support and cushioning.

 

WHAT DO YOU RECOMMEND THAT PEOPLE LOOK FOR WHEN IT COMES TO PICKING OUT A GOOD RAIN BOOT?

 

When choosing a rain boot, look for one that doesn’t bend easily in the mid arch.  This will provide more shock absorption, and in turn will result in less foot pain such as arch pain and heel pain.

Rain boots that have somewhat of a slight heel less than 3/4 inch in relation to the front is actually better for you than shoes that are completely flat because it takes the stress off the Achilles which can help with the alignment of your posture, ankles, knees and spine. Wearing rain boots that are completely flat allow our foot to collapse affecting our gait and posture, which can lead to a tremendous amount of stress placed not only to the foot but to the rest of the body.  

Our feet naturally pronate during the gait cycle, however when we wear shoes that are completely flat we pronate for a longer period of time which then alters the biomechanics and distribution of pressure and weight across the foot. This imbalance may increase the progression of underlying foot deformities such as bunions and hammertoes and lead to painful conditions associated with excessive pronation such as arch/ heel pain, shin splints/ posterior tibial tendonitis, and Achilles tendonitis.

Last but not least, rain boots should have wide a toe box to give the forefoot more wiggle room and places less aggravation to feet that suffer from bunions and hammertoes.

 

WHAT SHOULD YOU AVOID IN A RAIN BOOT AND WHY?

 

Rain boots can be hard on your feet if they don’t have at least a 3/4 of an inch heel rather than one that is completely flat as it places less tension on the Achilles tendon and will feel more comfortable. I recommend avoiding rain boots that are completely flat as they will contribute to pronation and collapse of the arch which may contribute to planter and posterior heel pain, shin splints, knee pain, and back pain.

I also recommend a rain boot that has an arched footbed incorporated into its design which can also help minimize discomfort.  Also, a rain boot should not have a toe box that is very narrow which will aggravate your feet especially if you suffer from bunions and hammertoes.

You should also avoid wearing rain boots as often as possible because the rubber material paired with a moist environment is a perfect combination for breeding foot conditions like mold, fungus, bacteria and wart viruses.  

 

 

Author
Dr. Miguel Cunha Dr. Miguel Cunha, founder of Gotham Footcare and a leading podiatrist in Manhattan, is a highly trained and skilled foot and ankle surgeon with experience treating a wide array of foot and ankle conditions from minor problems to complex reconstructive foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Cunha takes pride in having a genuine interest in each and every one of his patients while providing them the utmost compassion and exceptional care.

You Might Also Enjoy...

What to look for when purchasing summer sandals

As retail starts to open up in New York City you may be thinking about purchasing new sandals to head back to work. Dr. Cunha answers our questions on what to look for in a sandal to promote the best foot health.

Why should people wear shoes in the house?

Walking barefoot on hard surfaces for an extended amount of time is bad for your feet because it allows our foot to collapse which can lead to a tremendous amount of stress not only to the foot but to the rest of the body.

Know your Arch type

As a podiatrist we are often asked: How do I know what type of foot arch I have? Is it better to have high arches or flat feet? What are the different types of feet? Are high arches bad? What type of shoes should I wear for my arch type?